Tag Archives: Course Development

Course Design – Plan for Evaluation

Evaluation, like needs assessment, is not always given the attention it requires in the process of instructional design. In real world situations, the timeline often drives the work and is usually too short to fully incorporate everything that should be done.

Creating an Evaluation Plan, as part of the initial design, helps you to make a lot of decisions before getting underway and to integrate evaluation tasks as you move forward with a project.

Your Evaluation Plan should include at a minimum:

  • List of objectives for the evaluation – why are you evaluating the instruction and to whom will the results be reported?
  • Description of the data you need to collect and why – what kind of information do you need to collect in order to find out if the instruction is effective?  This can cover a wide range of measures, including:
    • Content accuracy
    • Learning outcome achievement
    • Usability of delivery format
    • Cost-effectiveness of the project
  • The logistics of how the evaluation will take place – How, when, where, and who will be involved in evaluation? Will you use surveys, administer tests, conduct interviews, etc.?

There are a lot of options in terms of models. You’ll find these to be very comprehensive in most cases. Consider creating a customized plan for your project or work context.

There  are full examples of  evaluation plans available online. Two to review:

What is your experience with evaluation as part of the instructional design process? Please consider sharing your experiences related to priority, timeframe, and method. Is evaluation conducted by members of your design team or by an outside group?

Photo credit: Pink Sherbet Photography, Flickr

Finding and Using Online Open Educational Resources

On June 22nd I’ll present a session titled Finding and Using Online Open Educational Resources (OER) to a group of online instructors as part of a professional development workshop series. The live presentation is to take place via Adobe Connect and the slides (with links to resources) are provided here via Slideshare.

My main objective with this presentation is to encourage faculty to seek out online content that has been made available for use in education and consider the pros/cons of adding OER to an academic course. The presentation introduces a  number of considerations for using this kind of content and I hope to spark some discussion about copyright and fair use.  This presentation also encourages instructors using open content to think about contributing their own content for others to use as well.

Do you have suggestions for sources of OER that you have used? Do you have any considerations regarding the challenges of incorporating OER into courses? Please reply with additional suggestions for us all. Thanks!

Course Design – Start with an Outline

From a project management perspective getting a brand new course moving can be a challenge. With a course revision, you’ve got a full draft right from the beginning in the form of the exiting course. With a new course, the momentum has to come from a complete stop. The work of Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) is critical in the design stage to ensure that the scope and sequence of the specific content and source(s) of content are all appropriate. SMEs who are also filling other professional roles, such as full-time faculty, need support that helps them to provide their expertise, stay focused on project goals, and complete assigned tasks on schedule.

The project manager/instructional designer can provide tools that both manage the process and result in the information developers need to build the course. For a new course, starting with a high-level outline can be helpful.  A simple table can serve this purpose: organizing thoughts and documenting a plan for the course. The format allows for moving things around and review by others on the team.

In the illustration below, columns list the components of a course unit and each row represents one unit (one week per unit is a typical – but not required or even recommended – way to plan).

Possible advantages of this approach:

  • Provides easy access for others on the team – to contribute, review, edit (Consider posting as a GoogleDoc or in a system that allows for file sharing and version control like Sharepoint or Basecamp).
  • Structures the course before moving to the more cumbersome and detailed development guide for full writing of the course.
  • Becomes a primary reference document for the course – you can go back to it.
  • Allows for division of labor later on – multiple people working on separate units at the same time.
  • Offers flexibility – add columns as needed (e.g. case study) and your own course/program nomenclature.
  • Provides documentation for approval at a critical point in the process – before development goes forward.

This is a plan, not a prescription. Not all units will require a synchronous seminar or have assignments due. In the next phase of development (writing the course content in a development guide) the outline may change somewhat, but it is there in the beginning to show the way forward.

It’s a simple tool that takes some time to complete early in the process. This time on the front-end will likely save your schedule later on. Take the time to frame the house before you begin to buy the furniture, or even put up drywall.

Do you use something like this to get a new course project moving? How do you provide initial support and guidance to content experts and course writers? Please share!